Charles L. Rosen, MD, PhD
Neurosurgeon and Former WVU Professor

The name of it was a hemangiopericytoma, and it was in the frontal lobe, the front part of my brain cavity, and it had grown to the size of a grapefruit. It was impacting my self-awareness, and so I was behaving in very different ways. And of course my wife, who knows me better than anyone, she, at a minimum, knew that I needed to be checked out by somebody competent and then started making inquiries as to who. And, without exception, the name that kept coming up was Dr. Rosen.

Like so many other professions, there’s an art and a science to doing it well, to being a true master of it. The science is the technical skills. By all accounts, he has, had at the time, and has, an outstanding reputation for competence, and he just exudes competence and confidence. You just have confidence in him. And again, pre-surgery, I wasn’t afraid because I had no self-awareness. People were like, “Oh, how did you, you know, gut it out?” And like, I didn’t gut anything out, I wasn’t even aware. But my wife derived an enormous amount of confidence that her husband was going to be fine because of what he said to her and to me, and how he said it.

Given the outcome that he created for me, it totally confirms the reputation that I, and everyone else that knows him, know to be true. I mean, he gave me my life back. I’m fully recovered now, you know the hair has grown back, the scar is healed, I’m back to work, I’m feeling good. I am forever grateful and would recommend him highly to anyone. Whether you know you need something done or not surgically, at a minimum have a conversation with him because you know I mentioned earlier, you know the art and the science of it. The science is the ability to do the medical work. I can’t even imagine how someone can do what they do. But it’s the art of it, the being brutally honest with people, being compassionate and caring, which he was to my children, to my brothers who rushed here to be with me, to my wife especially. He was so thoughtful and kind. That’s the art of doing it well.

I mean, again, first and foremost, give me a surgeon that is competent in the operating room, but if I can be selfish, give me one that’s also a fundamentally good person, that cares about the patient, and as important as that, cares very much about the patient’s family. This was the scariest part of my life, and I am forever grateful to Dr. Rosen for really navigating my whole family through this season of life. I don’t know what the future holds, I hope this is the darkest season of my life, but I don’t know that. But if I come up on another one, you know, I want somebody like Charles Rosen in charge.

Please note, the information provided throughout this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images, and video, on or available through this website is for general information purposes only. If you are experiencing relating symptoms, please visit your doctor or call 9-1-1 in an emergency. 

Meet Dr. Rosen

Dr. Rosen most recently served as Department Chair of Neurological Surgery at West Virginia University (WVU) School of Medicine from 2012 through 2017, following his 2011 appointment as Interim Department Chair.

He joined the faculty at WVU in 2001 and held various positions in the WVU Department of Neurosurgery, including vice chair, director of research and the neurosurgical research laboratories, and director of cranial base surgery.

He was professor of Neurosurgery and Program Director for Residency in Neurological Surgery in the WVU Department of Neurosurgery at WVU School of Medicine, among other academic and clinical roles.

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Please note, the information provided throughout this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images, and video, on or available through this website is for general information purposes only. If you are experiencing relating symptoms, please visit your doctor or call 9-1-1 in an emergency.